Jude’s Books

The Worst is Over

Called “The Bible of Crisis Communications,” this is a must have not just for every emergency worker, but for every home. This is the primer for what to say when every moment counts. In it you will…

- Find out about Iatrogenic illness, or illness that is induced by the doctor with only a few thoughtless words, and how you can counteract it yourself;

- Learn what you can say to your loved ones when they are sick, injured, or frightened that not only can help them through the crisis, but actually begin the healing process and possibly save a life;

- Discover how four simple words can help turn a crisis around;

- See how simple and effective Verbal First Aid is and why firefighters, police, doctors and nurses all over the world are turning to the most important healing tool of all: their words.

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Verbal First Aid for Children

Based on the same principles as The Worst is Over, this beautifully written and easy-to-follow book is geared to the special needs of parents when they are tending to children who are hurt, scared, or sick.

From separation anxiety and nightmares to fevers and lacerations, this book not only covers the concept of words as medicine, but illustrates it with detailed scenarios for dozens of different situations so you can refer to it easily when you need it most.

Excerpt:

As the leaves collect in tatters red and gold around the front porch, Eric, only 4 years old, sits on the rocking chair without moving, too small yet for his feet to reach the floor. “When’s Grandma coming home?” he asks. His father, sweeping a clean floor to keep busy, wants to say more, but only mumbles, “I don’t know.

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Verbal First Aid for Children

The Next Osama

At first glance, you may believe this to be a book about terrorism. And perhaps it is, but not in the way you are most likely imagining.
Focused on the lives of two young and suggestible parents in upstate New York, it is more precisely about the terror we feel inside ourselves.
Born in a rich area on the wrong side of the tracks, Jake and Marcy Ann Willsea were raised surrounded by a luxury they could only covet. Barely old enough to take care of themselves, they find themselves parents to a baby girl and saddled with all the responsibilities of that situation, but little of the joy.
When Marcy Ann believes that she has seen the next Osama masquerading as a homeless person in a convenience store, Jake believes that he has seen the way out of their hopelessly impoverished life. As Marcy Ann calls the FBI, Jake secretly calls a reporter.
When the media finds out about the two kids and whom they’ve seen, it ignites a frenzy.
So, in a sense, the book is less about terrorism than it is about terror. It’s about what media-induced fear does to us…how it alters our decisions, how it changes our priorities, how it shifts our consciousness so that the lives we could have had are no longer possible and we are thrown arms and legs akimbo into a high speed destiny stream from which we can never be freed.
It’s about that tiny, little moment when we are given the option to either say “enough” or we are driven past the event horizon and the universe says “enough” for us.
The Next Osama